Hello Workwell

Meet Lydia Loizides, A Woman Working Well

SoulAlyssa Davis
lydia loizides talentedly helloworkwell

"The only thing I can control is me. It’s a bit of a mantra." – Lydia Loizides

Meet Lydia Loizides

Lady boss extraordinaire. Real title: CEO of Talentedly and Hello Workwell

Q

You have an incredible company, Talentedly, and now a second brand branching off of it with Hello Workwell. How did you get into the entrepreneurial space?

A

I’ve always been in the entrepreneurial and startup space. My very first ‘company’ job out of college was with a tech startup in Vancouver, Canada, where I’m from. I joke that I was an entrepreneur before it was a fashion statement, but it’s true. People who know me think it’s odd: I’m an introvert, super-cerebral and rather risk-averse — not exactly characteristics you associate with startups and entrepreneurship. I think what attracts me to companies and opportunities is the potential for change. I love to work in chaos. Weird, I know.

Q

Why work wellness and career coaching?

A

Look, people spend more than 2/3 of every day working. We’ll spend fifty years of our life working. We spend more time with our coworkers than we do with our family and friends. Think about that. So, when I was thinking about what I wanted to do after the last startup I was working with in 2013, I was exhausted and lost. Looking back, I can honestly say that I was experiencing symptoms of PTSD from being there for four years. Professional coaching saved my professional sanity and confidence. I wanted to bring that experience to as many people as possible, not just the privileged like me who could afford it. So, Talentedly was born. At the time, we were the first subscription-based online professional coaching service. I thought about it as a gym membership for your career - pay a monthly fee and get one-on-one coaching from a certified professional coach. Today, we work with amazing companies that are deeply committed to investing in their employees and their professional happiness. Hello Workwell addresses a need that I’ve seen where people can find expert-based advice, products, and services for living their best work life. We’re working on some amazing product partnerships and collaborations.

“Professional coaching saved my professional sanity and confidence.” – Lydia Loizides

Q

What obstacles have you faced running your own company, and how did you overcome those?

A

I have faced every obstacle that anyone would face starting a company. As a woman, it’s harder. It’s a fact and I’m not going to lie or sugarcoat it. As a woman, you are held to a higher standard, dismissed faster, and overlooked by both men, and women by the way, with power. I have to remind myself that I’m lucky because my experience is probably an order of magnitude better than the experiences of the women of color that I know growing their businesses. What I’ve taught myself to do (thank you coach!) is control what I can: me. I will never change the mind of someone that is looking for the next wunderkind from Harvard or someone who looks just like them. So, rather than react to the bias, I make a mental note and move on. I actively search for people (both men and women) who are brave enough to admit what they don’t know and be conscious of their biases. It’s not easy, but this has allowed me to work with amazing people and companies.

“I actively search for people (both men and women) who are brave enough to admit what they don’t know and be conscious of their biases.” - Lydia Loizides

Q

Now for the cliché. Tell me a bit about the best boss you ever had.

A

My mom. I worked in her hair salon starting when I was 10 years old. I swept the floor, washed the towels and eventually washed hair, was the receptionist, bookkeeper, and inventory manager. She taught me how to listen, how to help people feel good about themselves and how to build trust. Think about it: women tell their hairdressers everything. I mean everything.

Q

And just for fun, give a little dirt on the worst you ever had.

A

A woman I worked for early on in my career gave me the worst advice you can ever give a woman: smile and nod. Who says that? I quit a few months later.

Q

How would you describe your managerial approach and style?

A

My style has changed over the years, I’d like to think for the better. I had a very low EQ early in my career. I was very matter-of-fact and tended to move quickly. I’ve learned, through coaching and experience, that business is personal for people. We really wrap a lot of our self-worth and self-value in our titles and our jobs. I’ve learned to respect that. Now I would call my style conscious-leadership, meaning, I’ve learned to ask myself to stop and assess how much of what I'm experiencing is my own sh*t or someone else’s. Again, the only thing I can control is me. It’s a bit of a mantra.

Q

If we had a budget for any one thing that would make you exponentially better at your job, what would it be?

A

A Head of Sales. Know anyone?

Q

You work with multiple teams of people all the time. You have your career coaches, your corporations, your direct consumers, and then, me. How do you find the time to balance each and the energy to give each group what they need every single day?

A

I’ve developed a system called the P1, P2, P3 (Priority) Method. It's built around Agile. It goes like this: everything I do has to drive an outcome of the business. P1s directly impact a goal, P2s are tangential, and P3s have no impact on a goal. I keep a list of my goals and assign tasks on my To Do list a 1, 2, or 3. I review it every day or two. I’ve learned that P3’s make me feel good, but I can cross them off the list. It’s fake progress. I try and ignore those. P2s get my attention after P1s. It’s weird but it works for me.

“Everything I do has to drive an outcome of the business.” – Lydia Loizides

Q

If someone were to take your current role, what advice would you give them going into it?

A

Think really, really hard about what you’re getting yourself into, and if you decide to take it, commit without hesitation. You’ll fail, you’ll succeed, you’ll definitely cry and on the odd occasion, you’ll laugh. However, when you get that email from a client that thanks you for changing their life at work, you’ll get this amazing feeling and you’ll be hooked.